Color Coded Interventions

Student Learning Style Surveys

You know how some students can be given the “hairy eyeball” and that’s all it takes and other students get the “hairy eyeball” and see that as “Those are fighting words…let’s go to the mat.” Well, it all has to do with personality traits. Reading personalities is about as easy as reading someone’s mind. Taking an old personality survey and revamping it for modern times and then pairing it with research based interventions we invented a new learning style survey. We used colors from the rainbow to describe different characteristics of student personalities and learning styles. By giving this survey, you will be able to determine a color code for each student and work specifically with those that you are having difficulty. You probably only need interventions for about 5% of the students in your classes. However, anyone can have a bad day and knowing how to deal with a student on a bad day is just as important as knowing how to deal with a student on a day to day basis.

Once you score the student learning style surveys- the student will be assigned a color. Choose the color below and click through the PowerPoint for ideas on how to CARE for this student:

Conduct– (What behavior can you expect?)

Aquire-(How do they learn?)

Regulate- (How should you discipline?)

Encouragement- (What excites them?)

RED

These students are usually fairly well adjusted and perform up to their capacity in school.

ORANGE

These students are usually fairly well adjusted and seldom develop emotional or behavioral problems. In fact, they may appear better adjusted than students with a typical profile. They do have a tendency to talk loudly and to respond impulsively.

YELLOW

These students are usually fairly well adjusted with few emotional or behavioral problems. They do not, however, respond well to being the center of attention, particularly unexpectedly or frequently. Teachers often mistake this type of student for a student with emotional problems.

GREEN

These students have a high incidence of emotional problems, e.g., phobias. They seldom show disruptive behavior, but may have emotional outbursts in stressful or threatening situations. Their behavior is usually easy to control and may become over-controlled.

BLUE

These students are outgoing and uninhibited as well as anxious and over reactive. These students will often be diagnoses with learning disabilities. These students’ performance improve when stimulated by interesting materials and activities.This child may exhibit an emotional over reaction when on a stimulant drug. Thus, educators should stimulate these students with materials and social interaction rather than emotional stimulation.

INDIGO

These students are emotionally over reactive, but usually are quiet and extremely cautious. They are often too stimulated to perform well in school and anything that reduces their anxiety will improve their performance. They frequently try to avoid things that most children find enjoyable and are particularly susceptible to school phobia. Because of their quiet reserved demeanor, teachers often do not recognize that they need special attention.

PURPLE

These students are likely to exhibit disruptive behaviors in the classroom. They may also try to dominate classmates through aggressive behavior. They are difficult to control through either reward or negative consequences and often engage in sensation seeking behavior. Sometimes a skillful teacher can use their sensation seeking behavior to enhance academic performance. Students with this profile who have above average intelligence can be very creative but even so will not be pleasant to work with. Students with this profile who are of lower intelligence have more
difficulty directing their behavior toward productive ends.

TURQUOISE

These students’ impulsive behavior is often directed toward other people and is often violent. These students will work in order to be stimulated. Stimulation is useful both during work and following work in order to get optimal performance. They respond better to rewards than negative consequences but don’t respond well to either.

PEACH

These students typically have a combination of emotional and behavioral problems. They often
engage in sensation seeking activities without regard for consequences. They also often over react to the emotional stimulation that results from their activities. This feedback keeps them in an almost continuous state of over stimulation and anxiety. They usually don’t do well academically and often don’t have the foresight to successfully commit serious misdeeds. You must constantly work to avoid over stimulating these students or allow them to over stimulate themselves. Students with this profile who have above average intelligence can be very creative, particularly in the area of the arts. Even so, they will not be pleasant to work with. Students with
these profiles that are of lower intelligence have more difficulty directing their behavior toward productive ends.

BURGUNDY

The hostile behavior in these students is usually directed at things rather than people.Vandalism is more common than fighting. Their behavior is likely to be unpredictable and to swing between impulsive and cautious in their responses- both of which are harmful to school performance. Thus, the recommendations for High Porpoise and Low Eagle may at times be contradictory and educators must be careful when employing recommendations from one area that educators don’t push the student to the other extreme. Stimulation during work periods will usually interfere with their performance. However, stimulation following work, as a reward, will increase the amount and quality of future work. Once they become stimulated, it is necessary to get them settled down before any they can productively resume work. The best times for stimulating activities is during breaks, lunch, recess or at the end of the day. Students with this profile who have above average intelligence can be very creative, particularly in the areas of science and technology. Students with this profile who are of lower intelligence have more difficulty directing their behavior toward productive ends.

LIME GREEN

These students are the most disruptive of all students. Techniques used to stimulate students high on Eagle and to reward students high on Porpoise can be used as long as they don’t involve stressful or emotional components. A teacher talking loudly or yelling at one of these students is likely to produce an emotional over reaction and physical aggression, probably directed at the teacher. Managing the behavior of this highly unusual type of student requires a constant effort. Students with this profile who have above average intelligence can be very creative, particularly in the area of the arts. Even so, they will not be pleasant (0 work with. Students with this profile who are of lower intelligence have more difficulty directing their behavior toward productive ends and is the profile with the worst prognosis.

HOT PINK

These students are likely to be more fearful and anxious and likely to be less openly aggressive than students in Lime Green. More attention should be given to reducing anxiety than to controlling aggression. Their behavior is often erratic, swinging between emotional outburst and withdrawal, but ineffective. Stimulation during work should be avoided even as a consequence for good work because they may become too stimulated for optimal performance.

Whole  Learning Style Survey

Printable Cards

Seating chart

 

Based on the original work of the following:

Eysenck: Eysenck, H. J. (1990). Biological dimensions of personality. In L. A. Pervin (Ed.), Handbook of personality: Theory and research (pp. 244-276). New York: Guilford.

Corulla: ” Adapted from: Corulla, W. (1990). A revised version of the P Scale for children, Personality and Individual Differences. 11(1), 65-76.

Wakefield: Wakefield, J. (1979). Using Personality to Individualize Instruction. San Diego: EDITS Publisbers (Box 7234; San Diego, CA 92107).

Center: Center, D. B. (1999). Strategies for social and emotional behavior. Norcross, GA: XanEdu.